Exhibitions

Who's filling up the walls of VOV?



Hype How Are You? I’m Fined, Thank You.

Artist/Type of Exhibit : Ronald Caringal

Date : March 13

Time : 6:00 PM

artworks >


Into The Woods

Artist/Type of Exhibit : Lee Salvador

Date : March 13

Time : 6:00 PM

“Into the Woods” surveys the idea of escapism through fantasy. Lee Salvador explores the existence and company of living creatures most of us are familiar with: including owls, foxes, and turtles. Animals are visualized as creatures who listen and empathize to the musings of the main character; true to form, Lee admits it’s easier to talk to them than to humans, most of the time. He introduces his distinctive blue character in a forest setting from which these creatures have seemingly accepted him in their gloomy environment; and the animals’ facial expressions imply their own emotional standing: in the midst of fantasy or are on the brink of seeking escape themselves.

Lee is fascinated with Japanese culture, and the Japanese words he placed in the background of his pieces — depression, sadness, darkness, abandonment, separation anxiety, and isolation — came from first-hand experiences. From this, he drew his creativity, spark, and empathy. The culture where he reflected upon: wherein seclusion and solitude are endemic, and working to the point of physical and mental exhaustion is seen by many as ordinary, heavily influenced his artistic framework.

“Into the Woods” can be interpreted as a tendency to seek diversion and relief from displeasing realities by engaging in fantasy. As a general thought, escapism holds a negative connotation. Lee Salvador came to explore if it is negative or, if in fact, essential for survival. For him, avoiding unpleasant realities is only detrimental if the fantasy becomes an alternate reality from which one can never return.

Text by: Grace A. Ng

 

 

artworks >


Little Packages of Incomprehensible Things

Artist/Type of Exhibit : Isha Naguiat

Date : March 13

Time : 6:00 PM

In Little Packages of Incomprehensible Things, Isha Naguiat continues her explorations in mixed media, this time evoking ruminations on the self and the anxieties that color its interactions with others. To behold her work is always to take into account the interplay of the transferred image, the embroidered texts, and the forms of the fabrics. Due to the nature of these materials, her pieces often employ layering, suffused as they are with gentle translucencies and occlusions. It is a sensibility that serves well to investigate the personal and relational. Conjuring internal aspects glimpsed yet unrevealed– either by choice or circumstance– and the subsequent difficulties in communion that such situations bring about.

For this exhibition, Naguiat embroiders her thoughts and words across her pictures. In one set of works, only the backside of the embroidered texts are viewable– a double act of occlusion of both self-image and speech as if both were immune to transmission. On another set, phrases muttered during various attempts at communicating are imposed on top of personal images. Legibility, however, does not imply communication. More often, attempts at communicating can be haphazard, awry, infuriating, and prone to mishap, precisely because the self remains incomprehensible, and thus, isolated and distant. There is often an acute sense of longing in being heard but not understood, seen but not recognized. The self longs to reach outward even if wayward doubts consign us instead to cautiousness. How often are we caught between a palpable desire for intimacy and our own stifling inhibitions? And how infuriating are these nagging thoughts that seemingly fetter our expressions.

In this, the gesture of embroidering, a repetitive act that paves the way for a confrontations with one’s thoughts, seems apt. It mirrors thought in as much as the labored stitch is akin to a relentless questioning. As Naguiat remarked, “Embroidery is asking yourself the same question again and again, and needing to be sure again and again.”

artworks >

Page 1 of 27123...510...Last »